2016 review: September

Fabric closed, which led us to lament about the musical heritage which had been lost since we left London.  Turnmills, The End, The Cross… we cut our teeth here, we lost and then found ourselves, we made friends and made memories, we danced til dawn and back again.  As much as life is both fluid and cyclic, it’s sad for us that those who follow will never have access to the same experiences.  The world is the more sanitised and bland for places like these no longer existing.

Back to the present, our remix for Passerine was released.  It was a hard one to pull off in terms of the concept we came up with and the samples we wanted to use, but somehow it worked.

2016 review: August

We decided to make our next release an LP rather than an EP, which took it from being almost done to being almost half done.  We started gearing up our collaborations for it, and bought a Lyrical School t-shirt.  August was a good month.

2016 review: July

In July, we were still in the UK.  We went to London to see Pamyu Pamyu live, and it was even better than we thought it would be.

July was also peak Pokemon Go.  Whatever happened to that?

2016 review: June

After the excitement of releasing our debut album in May, June was spent doing promo and interviews, and then going to the UK (where it was raining).  By this time, we had also finished the first batch of demos for our next release, which we thought would be an EP.

2016 review: May

In May, we launched our debut album into the world.  It came out on digital and tape, both of which are available here as well as the usual streaming and digital places, as well as a few record shops around the Seattle area.  Here’s the awesome video for Transpose that kept our friend Tessa busy for half a year, but which won her a Vimeo staff pick for her first animation –

2016 review: April

With our album release locked in for May, we worked on our special launch live set.  A note on these: people tend to slate electronic music live for being “hit play” or whatever, or that there’s no particular skill or effort that goes into playing.  They might have a point, it is possible to just hit play and then spend the next hour occasionally pressing a button so that it looks like you’re doing something.  The thing about playing electronic music live is that there is a near infinite number of ways to do this, so there is a near-infinite spectrum that ranges from press play, have a beer, whatever, right through to improvising everything on the spot.  For our own part, we have spent the last few years constantly thinking through what it means to play live, and how to present something that is on the one side manageable enough for one person with two hands to play, but on the other side, has enough spontaneity and improvisation to make it fun.  For the last couple of years, we’ve done a full a/v set where possible, which places certain parameters on the way the set has to be laid out given the limitations we have (amount of hands, amount of RAM).  As well as this, the visual component especially takes a long time to prepare.  In this case basically all of our free time for two and a half months.  We did that specifically so that we could present a single hour of music the way that we wanted to present it.  And it was worth it.

2016 review: March

My memory is not great so I’ll be honest, I’m getting most of the info for this from Instagram.  March seems to be therefore… a time spent eating burgers.  I’m sure it was fun.  We also started demo’ing stuff for our second LP whilst waiting for the release of the first.